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Project Stove Swap Heats Up

February 6th, 2017

It’s been an amazing year for Project Stove Swap! Looking back at where this project started, I could not be happier with the results we’ve seen and where we’re headed.

Where We’ve Been

If you don’t know, Project Stove Swap operates under the umbrella of Clean Air Minnesota—a diverse coalition of air quality leaders working to reduce emissions by 10%. While Clean Air Minnesota partners identified wood smoke as a crucial area for emissions reductions, no funding was available for a project.

Recognizing that many of Northeastern Minnesota residents rely on wood as a heat and energy source, Environmental Initiative and partners decided it was the perfect region to implement a wood smoke reduction effort and, with help from Minnesota Power and a large network of regional partners, Project Stove Swap was born.

WHERE WE ARE

Now, a year or so later, we’ve officially launched Project Stove Swap in 17 Northeastern Minnesota counties. In short, Project Stove Swap provides financial incentives to consumers and businesses to replace older wood heating appliances with more efficient, less-polluting technologies.

Last week, Environmental Initiative staff and partners came together at one of the project’s vendors, Duluth Stove and Fireplace, to commemorate the launch. We heard from store co-owner Matt Boo, Environmental Initiative’s Mike Harley, Amy Rutledge of Minnesota Power, and Allison Rajala Ahcan about the importance of the project from an environmental and economic perspective.

You can read and watch the news coverage of the event below.

WHERE WE’RE GOING

Since the official launch, our phones have been ringing and ringing from residents, businesses, and stove vendors wanting to participate. I’m always working on getting vendors set up with the project, so if you don’t have a Project Stove Swap vendor in your county, you will soon!

Even beyond this last week’s media coverage, the goal has always been to expand the project and reach the whole state. All Minnesotans should reap the benefits of a newer, cleaner heating alternative. After all, it does get pretty cold here, so any way we can help people be safer, pollute less, and support local businesses is always a good thing. I can’t wait to share all the stories that come out of Project Stove Swap with you, so stayed tuned.

Mikey Weitekamp

POSTED BY:

Senior Project Manager, Environmental Initiative

Introducing Project Stove Swap

November 3rd, 2016

Since Clean Air Minnesota’s inception, members of the partnership have been thinking about and working on many strategies to improve Minnesota’s air quality. While wood smoke had been identified as a major source of pollutants, a significant funding source has not been available to start a project until this year with Minnesota Power. After consulting with air experts, securing funding, setting concrete goals, and hiring staff (me!), we’re excited to introduce Project Stove Swap.

PSS-HEADER-shortIn short, Project Stove Swap is a voluntary wood stove change-out program. The project provides financial incentives to residents and organizations to replace old appliances with new, more efficient, less-polluting technologies. Currently, Project Stove Swap is working in 17 Northeastern Minnesota counties. We’re excited to be expanding the scope of our clean air work (And I’m excited to be visiting 17 Northeastern Minnesota counties on a regular basis!) 

How Project Stove Swap Works

Residents and organizations that use older, non-EPA certified wood heaters as a primary or major heat source are eligible for a financial incentive to change out their appliance.

To start, participants can contact one of our pre-qualified vendors, to verify their eligibility, select a new appliance, and fill out an application. If approved, vendors will provide the Project Stove Swap incentive as a straight discount off of the total cost at the time of payment. Learn more about the application and change-out process »

Why Wood Smoke?

While the smell of wood smoke on a crisp November day may seem cozy and nostalgic, wood smoke is composed of gases, chemicals, and fine particles that can lead to a variety of serious health issues. The finest particles are so small that they can be absorbed by your lungs and enter your bloodstream, causing cardiac and respiratory complications. Learn more about your health and wood smoke »

While Minnesota is fortunate to have generally good air quality, negative health effects of air pollution are being observed at ever lower concentrations. Because of this, federal air quality standards are predicted to become stricter over time, putting Minnesota at risk of violating these standards.

Swapping out just one older wood stove for a new, more efficient model is the pollution reduction equivalent of removing over 700 cars from the road per year. In other words, it’s a cost effective way to proactively and voluntarily reduce air pollution, improve health outcomes, and avoid costly federal regulations. In addition, many of the heating appliances are made in Minnesota and all of the vendors are Minnesota-based so every dollar Project Stove Swap spends is pumped into the local economy.

We’re just getting Started

Project Stove Swap is just one of several efforts underway to help achieve Clean Air Minnesota’s goal of reducing man-made sources of fine particulate matter (soot) and ground level ozone precursor emissions (smog) by 10%.

Though we’re thrilled our clean air work is growing, we’re never really satisfied. While our efforts in Northeastern Minnesota will continue for at least the next year, we’re keeping our eyes peeled for ways to improve and expand the project.

Getting Involved

Want to get involved? Contact me at 612-334-3388 ext. 8109 to learn more about replacing your wood burning appliance, becoming a participating a vendor, or educating your community about wood smoke. Visit our frequently asked questions page for additional information.

Mikey Weitekamp

POSTED BY:

Senior Project Manager, Environmental Initiative

Six Ways We’re Working to Improve Air Quality

March 10th, 2014

school bus exhaustLate last week we had our first air quality alert days of the year. What exactly does that mean? The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency issues an air pollution health alert when air quality conditions reach levels that are unhealthy for sensitive groups like children, the elderly, and those who suffer from cardiovascular or upper respiratory ailments. When alerts are issued, these groups are encouraged to postpone vigorous activity and minimize their exposure to sources of air pollution like heavy-duty vehicle traffic and wood fires.

We’re fortunate to have relatively clean air statewide, but as demonstrated last week, we still have days when air quality is poor. We’re also fortunate have an engaged group of air quality leaders who have been working since November to develop projects that reduce air pollution, improve our environment, and protect the health of all Minnesotans. (more…)

Gena Gerard

POSTED BY:

Director, Clean Air Program

Weekly Wrap-Up: Air Pollution

February 14th, 2014

Last week, the Clean Air Minnesota Work Group reconvened to continue prioritizing strategies to reduce emissions. We heard presentations about two possible ideas: expanding the use of alternative fuels and making investments in our urban forests. Note: you can check out the presentations here. The goal of Clean Air Minnesota is to translate good ideas into actual air quality projects that reduce ozone and fine particulate matter emissions.

The creativity of this group is inspiring and air quality has been on my mind as a result. Here’s the top content I’ve picked up on air quality and air pollution in recent weeks:

  1. More reasons to keep reducing emissions: EPA considers tightening the ozone standard to 60ppm (E&E Publishing).
  2. Oregon and California work to clean up older diesel vehicles (Portland Tribune).
  3. INFOGRAPHIC: A crackling fire may smell good, but it’s not good for you. (New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking).
  4. Target pays fine for diesel generator air pollution violations (Star Tribune).
  5. Air quality and health: Breathing air pollution during pregnancy may increase complications like preeclampsia (Daily News & Analysis: India).

At Environmental Initiative we’re dedicated to reducing emissions collaboratively in partnership with diverse stakeholders through our facilitation of the Clean Air Minnesota partnership. Learn more here »

 

Emily Franklin

POSTED BY:

Director of Communications
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