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Rice Creek Commons is Common Sense— Meet the Natural Resource Winners

April 25th, 2017

The Natural Resources category award is given to collaborative efforts that implement sustainable solutions to preserve, protect, or restore Minnesota’s land, water, biological diversity, and other natural resources.

In the land of 10,000 lakes, you can see why recognizing efforts to restore waterways and landscapes is so important.

Ramsey County, the City of Arden Hills, Wenck Associates, Inc. and many other partners are currently working to restore a piece of polluted land that has been around since World War II: The Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant.

AMMUNITION PLANT TO  VIBRANT COMMUNITY

 

 

Four years ago, Ramsey County purchased a contaminated parcel of land in Arden Hills with the goal of making it a community asset. The land once held the Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant, built to manufacture small arms ammunition during World War II, and had sat dormant for nearly four decades. Partnering with the City of Arden Hills, the county began redeveloping the brownfield into a livable space for homes and businesses.

Over a 32-month period, existing buildings were demolished, and the soil was remediated to residential standards. We removed hazardous waste and recycled or reused materials like concrete and asphalt. This past summer, the county collaborated with the Rice Creek Watershed District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and Minnesota Department of Natural Resources to transform Rice Creek, which runs through the site, back to its original, meandering path and stabilize it with surrounding trees and plants.

With the site demolished and soil restored to residential standards, infrastructure construction is set to begin this year. Soon Rice Creek Commons (named after the site’s stream) will be a walkable, vibrant commercial and residential development, creating economic and social opportunity for Arden Hills and the region.

FROM THE PROJECT PARTNERS

“When the county purchased the land, it was the largest superfund site in Minnesota. The large cost and difficulty associated with cleaning up the site had discouraged previous developers for many years. Because the property presented unique challenges, the Ramsey County Board of Commissioners recognized the land would probably stay polluted and empty for many more years unless they took action.

The project is also unique in that Ramsey County is a fully developed county. With few opportunities to grow and increase the area’s tax base, developments like Rice Creek Commons present an important opportunity for economic development.” – Heather Worthington, Deputy County Manager

“I’m proud that this project respects the history of the site and what was there before. Redeveloping the area is about honoring its past and making it a safe, economic engine once again.” – Heather Worthington, Deputy County Manager

Read the Pioneer Press piece: A cheer for Rice Creek Commons »

CELEBRATE THIS EFFORT

Join us on Thursday, May 25 to congratulate and celebrate these project partners, their positive environmental outcomes, and the lasting benefit of collaboration. To shake things up, we’re also honoring three individuals in honor of our 25th anniversary, so it’s sure to be a night of reflection and festivities for Minnesota’s environmental community. Purchase your tickets or tables here »

 


A note from Environmental Initiative:
In honor of Environmental Initiative’s 25th Anniversary, four organizational and two individual awards will be presented on May 25, 2017 at the Nicollet Island Pavilion. Get your tickets before they’re gone »

Damian Goebel

POSTED BY:

Communications Director

Hooray for the Natural Resources Finalists

May 12th, 2016

If you’ve been following along, you know that each week we are featuring finalists for the 2016 Environmental Initiative Awards. Coming at you this week are the finalists in the Natural Resources category. The Natural Resources category recognizes collaborations designed to implement sustainable solutions to preserve, protect, or restore Minnesota’s land, water, biological diversity, and other natural resources.

Coffee Creek Daylighting and Restoration

Flooding in 2012 severely damaged sections of Coffee Creek in Duluth, creating the opportunity to restore and Coffee Creek Daylight and Restoration - Blogdaylight the section of stream located on a golf course back to a natural stream. The new stream channel provides valuable habitat for trout, ensures the passage of aquatic species, provides a natural oasis for golfers, is more resilient for future flood events, and promotes sustainable redevelopment of urban land.

“The project partners successfully created a more resilient stream that is less likely to sustain damage in the future,” said Chris Kleist with the City of Duluth. He is proud the partners were able to balance interests and find common ground to restore this highly visible section of Coffee Creek.

Read more about how Coffee Creek Daylighting and Restoration protects and promotes environmental, social, and economic considerations of stream restoration »

Faces of Tomorrow

Focused on addressing the underrepresentation of people of color and females in natural resources careers, Faces of Faces of TomorrowTomorrow uses an innovative approach to reduce barriers to participation and increase overall diversity in the natural resources field. To prepare young adults to be competitive for federal natural resources jobs, selected program participants receive intensive training and hands-on experience in conservation management.

Read more on the ways Faces of Tomorrow is ensuring the future natural resources workforce more accurately reflects the community it serves »

Grand Marais Creek Outlet Restoration

After 100 years of environmental damage, this cooperative effort between the watershed, landowners, and state and Grand Marais Creek Outlet Restoration-Bloglocal governments restored six miles of the Grand Marais Creek Outlet back to pre-1905 conditions. Physical and hydrological restoration of the creek included improving runoff and water quality, restoring aquatic and prairie habitat, and creating channel connectivity.

Myron Jesme is proud to work on a project that restored “agricultural land that was flood prone and turned it back into native prairie, restoring the aquatic habitat of the Grand Marais Creek.”

Read more about Grand Marais Creek Outlet Restoration’s cooperative effort to improve agricultural and natural resources land use »

Don’t miss the opportunity to mingle with the project partners who worked on these great projects. This is the last week to purchase tables and/or seats for the ceremony on Thursday, May 26. Next week we are featuring the last three finalists – stay tuned!

Andrea Robbins

POSTED BY:

Director, Engagement and Systems

Policy Forum Recap: 2013 Legislative Preview

January 2nd, 2013

On Thursday, December 20, a bipartisan group of legislators along with a crowd of over 200 members of Minnesota’s environmental community gathered in downtown Saint Paul for our annual Legislative Preview Policy Forum. Each year, the event gives an audience from the public, private, and nonprofit sectors the chance to hear from Minnesota lawmakers about their environmental priorities for the coming legislative session.

A short presentation from Minnesota Management and Budget’s John Pollard and Michelle Mitchell highlighted future budget uncertainties the state will have to contend with this year. They also reminded us of the relatively tiny share of funding that is allocated to environment, energy, and natural resources (0.7 % of general fund spending, and 3.2% of total state spending).

(more…)

Georgia Rubenstein

POSTED BY:

Senior Manager, Sustainability Program
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