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Minnesota Companies are Shaping our Clean Energy Future

December 7th, 2017

The Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition is on the cutting edge of the corporate clean energy purchasing trend. According to GreenBiz, “more than 80 of the world’s largest corporations [have committed] to 100 percent renewable energy… As the list of completed projects grows, the trend initiated by leading companies is moving beyond the early adopters to the mainstream.” The Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition seeks to lead our state toward increased renewables purchasing and new clean energy option development.

Recently, the Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition took a huge step forward in our corporate renewable energy procurement work by hosting Renewables Purchasing: Corporate Leadership through Clean Energy. The workshop, broken into two sessions, brought together Coalition member companies and Minnesota’s business sustainability leaders at Best Buy’s corporate office to determine what renewable energy procurement options members may want to pursue individually and collectively.

DISCUSSING GREEN TARIFF PROGRAMS AND VPPAs

The first session focused on utility-based purchasing options. To lead the discussion, Environmental Initiative brought in Letha Tawney with World Resources Institute (WRI), an international expert in working closely with leaders to turn big ideas into action to sustain our natural resources.

WRI gave an overview of Minnesota’s electricity regulatory context, which constrains the options available to corporate purchasers, and facilitated utility-customer discussions to uncover the values and priorities of corporate customers and identify ways to improve future offerings. Through this discussion, members explored barriers to purchasing and the potential to develop unique green tariff products.

 

The afternoon session was facilitated by Mark Porter and Ali Rotatori with Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI), and internationally renowned expert in accelerating the adoption of market-based solutions that cost-effectively shift from fossil fuels to efficiency and renewables. Coalition members received an overview of non-utility purchasing options and Virtual Power Purchase Agreements (VPPAs), including market basics, financial considerations, and understanding risk. In addition, attendees explored the internal decision-making process required to execute a renewable energy deal. Ultimately, a VPPA is a financial agreement that requires the involvement of a variety of company functions– from energy managers to the CFO.

WHAT’S NEXT?

From here, Coalition companies and utilities are actively engaged in creating new, easier ways for private entities to purchase renewables, including exploring creating new options. These discussions will not only help companies meet their individual renewable energy goals, but it adds more sustainable sources of energy to the system, opening up opportunities for others outside of the Coalition.

In addition, members will explore the potential to aggregate our purchasing demand. Overall, we’re excited to continue our renewable energy purchasing pursuit with Minnesota’s leading companies and sustainability leaders.

Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition members know that, collectively, we have the power to not only add renewables to the grid, but also demonstrate clean energy leadership in our region. Ultimately, we believe there is a clear and undeniable need for businesses to work together to achieve environmental goals and advance our vision for a circular economy that runs on 100% renewable energy.

If you want to learn more about how utilities’ Integrated Resource Planning (IRP) process could evolve to accommodate a more diverse electric generation system, changing consumer demands, and a more efficient, more renewable, and lower-carbon grid, check out our upcoming Policy Forum: The Evolution of Utility Resource Planning: Designing for Disruption.


This workshop was a continuation of the Coalition’s clean energy work on renewable procurement. You can view the slides from both the morning and afternoon sessions. Earlier this year, we set the foundation for members to talk about potential actions through a webinar focused on the best practices in corporate clean energy purchasing.

Stephanie Weir

POSTED BY:

Project Manager

Andersen Corporation: Member of the Month

November 15th, 2017

Andersen Corporation, a longtime supporter and partner of Environmental Initiative, is our Member of the Month for November. This year, at the 25th Anniversary Environmental Initiative Awards, Andersen’s Eliza Clark was honored as an Emerging Leader— the very first recipient of the award. Clark is the Director of Sustainability and Environmental at Andersen Corporation, a founding member of the Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition, and the Vice Chair of Super Bowl LII’s Sustainability Committee. She’s a standout in corporate sustainability, and known for unifying others. You can learn more below about Andersen Corporation’s environmental leadership below.

 

1. What drew you to be a board member of Environmental Initiative?

Andersen Corporation has been one of Environmental Initiative’s longest and most enthusiastic supporters. We believe in the power of unconventional partnerships to solve tough problems, which is at the core of Environmental Initiative’s mission. I am proud and humbled to have the opportunity to serve on the board of an organization that is both convening and leading some of the most innovative and effective environmental programs in our region.

2. What makes Environmental Initiative such a hub for successful environmental collaborations?

I believe Environmental Initiative’s success is largely due to its outstanding staff who have consistently demonstrated not only technical acumen, but also authenticity, empathy, and inclusiveness over the organization’s 25-year history. Leaders across our region have come to trust Environmental Initiative to help bridge challenging barriers to build understanding, focus, and momentum.

3. How does Environmental Initiative support your goals and mission as Director of Sustainability at Andersen Corporation?

We have bold goals at Andersen to advance environmental responsibility outside our four walls. Environmental Initiative provides a key platform to work with other companies, NGOs, and public sector partners to assess and tackle systemic problems and opportunities.

4. Andersen Corporation has sponsored Environmental Initiative’s Business and the Environment Series for over a decade. Why?

The Business and the Environment Series (fondly known as “BES” to its regulars) has consistently delivered quality educational content and best practice sharing among environmental practitioners across Minnesota. We are grateful that we had the opportunity to foster, support and grow this network of collaborators who share the belief that our society benefits when we share knowledge and resources.

5. You were the 2017 recipient of Environmental Initiative’s Emerging Leader award. What did receiving the award mean to you?

This year’s Environmental Initiative Awards had a special dynamism tied to the organization’s 25th anniversary. It was amazing to feel the energy and shared resolve in the room that evening. As I stated in my remarks, I feel incredibly lucky to be working in the field of sustainability within the best environmental community anywhere– much of which is tied to Environmental Initiative’s leadership and history.

6. As we look to the future, what role do you see Environmental Initiative playing in advancing sustainability in our region?

With programs like the Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition, Environmental Initiative is on the cusp of an exciting new chapter in its history– one the is propelled by its extensive network and credibility as an effective convener. I am very excited for the work ahead of the organization and look forward to celebrating many measurable wins and partnerships over the next 25 years!


Each month, we feature information about one of our members on the Initiative blog and on our website. Contact Sacha Seymour-Anderson anytime at 612-334-3388 ext. 8108 to learn more about this membership benefit.

Sacha Seymour-Anderson

POSTED BY:

Development Director

Leading the region to a clean energy economy

October 10th, 2017

Corporate demand for renewable energy is one of the key drivers in renewables growth in the United States. According to a recent Deloitte Resources 2017 Study, “What’s clear is that the train has left the station: Renewable energy is vital for corporations, and corporate procurement now rivals policy as a driver of growth in the sector.”

The Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition (MNSGC) is getting on board, leading the region to a clean energy economy. Coalition members are working together to find the best opportunities to collectively add more renewable energy to our existing systems. The group has identified aggregating renewable energy purchasing as a tangible way to demonstrate the demand for renewables in Minnesota.

In partnership with national experts, World Resources Institute and Rocky Mountain Institute, coalition members are planning a series of trainings with the goal of identifying and pursuing utility-based and non-utility renewable energy, both individually and collectively.

After months of planning, the Coalition kicked off this effort by hosting a webinar with WRI. This opportunity set a foundation of common understanding of best practices for corporate renewable energy procurement and introduced Coalition members to the factors unique to the Minnesota landscape.

Next, the Coalition will host Renewables Purchasing: Corporate Leadership through Clean Energy, a day-long event on the renewable energy procurement options available for the private sector in Minnesota. Through facilitated conversations, participants and organizations will:

  • Explore all the options available to Minnesota companies to procure renewable energy in the state of Minnesota (utility and non-utility)
  • Provide feedback on utilities’ renewable energy purchasing options and identify ways to improve future offerings
  • Identify which procurement options attendees want to pursue beyond this event— aggregated and individual— and have the opportunity to further engage, act on, and/or develop those options

The Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition is on the cutting edge of the corporate renewable purchasing trend. The landscape has grown exponentially in the last 5 years. The Coalition’s pursuit of renewables purchasing, especially the potential for aggregating demand, showcases true regional leadership and our commitment to 100% renewables in Minnesota, and ultimately, a circular economy.

Stephanie Weir

POSTED BY:

Project Manager

Our Journey to Shape a Circular Economy (So Far)

September 28th, 2017

About 18 months ago, Environmental Initiative and Minnesota’s business leaders began drawing up a new partnership. Along with sustainability experts in our state, we came to the conclusion that no one company can solve the environmental problems of today on their own. Huge issues, like Minnesota’s water quality or organic waste recycling, cannot be completely addressed by one company alone.

The Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition came out of that realization. The Coalition is a business-led initiative focused on collective action. The growing partnership started out with a huge goal: move from a linear, waste-generating economy to a circular, waste-transforming economy.

A year and a half later, the Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition is a group of more than 30 members who’ve achieved a great deal to begin making impactful change.

Year one, and a little more

We officially launched the Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition in June 2016 and were immediately noticed, with over 500,000 social media impressions and coverage in 12 local and national news outlets. We were even called out in the Harvard Business Review as one of the top 9 sustainability trends in 2016. By 2017, the number of coalition members has doubled to 32, including seven from the Fortune 500. The need and desire for this type of innovative partnership were apparent.In its first year, members worked together to develop the infrastructure to support such major undertakings, despite being composed of highly diverse organizations. Perhaps most importantly, we developed our first three focus areas – advancing clean energy, converting organic waste into valuable resources, and protecting or restoring the natural water cycle.

In its first year, members worked together to develop the infrastructure to support such major undertakings, despite being composed of highly diverse organizations. Perhaps most importantly, we developed our first three focus areas – advancing clean energy, converting organic waste into valuable resources, and protecting or restoring the natural water cycle.

Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition Meeting 8-17-16

100 percent renewable energy

The Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition recognized early on that a circular economy can only exist if it is powered by 100 percent renewable energy, which is why members selected clean energy as the initial priority for action.

Throughout 2017, we’ve been focused almost solely on how we can advance that goal. Currently, we’re working on building a roadmap for the state of Minnesota to follow and work toward 100 percent renewable energy. The Coalition is also planning a series of workshops for members to better understand renewable energy options available to them and how to work together to purchase renewable energy more efficiently.

Impacts on water

Our next area of work—which we’ve just begun scoping— will focus on the role Minnesota businesses can play in improving regional waterways, which are in many ways our most valuable natural resource. We can’t wait to be able to share more details with you in the coming months.

The Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition has made a lot of headway in the past 18 months in defining and shaping goals toward such a big outcome—a regional, circular economy. What makes it exciting is the way this work is taking shape. We’re beginning to see the true potential for a circular system. Through our work so far, we know our goal is possible and achievable—and will have a limitless impact.

Sam Hanson

POSTED BY:

Director, Sustainability Program

Meet Great River Energy, Member of the Month

September 6th, 2017

Great River Energy (GRE) has a long history with Environmental Initiative (remember when it was Minnesota Environmental Initiative?). One of our early connections was with Energy Alley, which provided a clearinghouse of environmental information for businesses and individuals.

Energy Alley was the first collaborative effort in Minnesota to advance renewable energy and efficiency in what is now known as the clean energy sector.

Over the years, GRE has continued to support Environmental Initiative’s work, and we congratulate this fine non-profit organization on 25 very successful years of bringing together stakeholders– businesses, NGOs, government, citizens– to work toward viable solutions to Minnesota’s environmental problems.

ORGANIZATIONAL PARTNER TO MULTIPLE PROJECTS

For many years GRE has been a premier sponsor of Environmental Initiative’s annual Environmental Initiative Awards event. This event brings together over 400 environmental leaders to celebrate and honor innovative projects that have achieved extraordinary environmental results through the power of partnership. GRE has also been a long-time sponsor of Environmental Initiative’s Legislative Preview, a Policy Forum event hosted each year. We are a member of the Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition which, led by members of the business community, has worked on initiatives including growth in renewable energy for electric end uses such as electric vehicles. Through this work and outside of it, GRE views Environmental Initiative as a stakeholder in the environmental community and seeks their input.

PERSONAL INVOLVEMENT AND DEDICATION

Personally, I’ve been involved with Environmental Initiative for more than 10 years and was honored to serve on the organization’s board for nine of those years. During that time, I was able to experience a closer view of the “inner workings” of Environmental Initiative. An organization’s most important asset is its employees, and Environmental Initiative is no exception. I have always been impressed with the quality and dedication of staff. Each brings a unique skill set and vibrant enthusiasm to their job. Professionally leading the organization and thoughtfully carrying out its mission is Executive Director Mike Harley, who is celebrating his 20-year anniversary with the organization next month. Through Mike’s leadership, relationships, commitment and energy, Environmental Initiative continues to evolve and remains a highly respected organization in our community.

So, happy 25th birthday, Environmental Initiative– and here’s to 25 more fantastic years of making positive change happen for the betterment of our environment and our citizens.


Each month, we feature information about one of our members on the Initiative blog and on our website. Contact Sacha Seymour-Anderson anytime at 612-334-3388 ext. 8108 to learn more about this membership benefit.

Mary Jo Roth

POSTED BY:

Manager, Environmental Services at Great River Energy

Sustainability Snapshot: The Metropolitan Airports Commission

July 26th, 2017

Every quarter, the Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition holds meetings with more than 30 members to discuss updates, our three focus areas (renewable energy, clean water, and organics), and ultimately how we’re working toward a circular economy through sustainability.

Working toward a “circular economy” is still a wonky concept to many folks, but something that’s a little easier to wrap our heads around are on-the-ground sustainability efforts by our members. Together, we’re working to combine these efforts, and the minds behind them, to make transformative results possible. In other words, no one business alone can transform the way we see waste, water, or energy.

Each business and organization in the Coalition is simply building on their existing sustainability efforts by working together to create a cumulative impact.

In our last meeting, we got to know what one of our members, the Metropolitan Airports Commission (MAC), is currently doing in their sustainability operations—and what they bring to the table for collective action. Walking through the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport (MSP), we all got to know the ways the MAC is saving water, promoting local business, and meeting customer needs.

SUSTAINABILITY AT MSP

Restroom Retrofits

The MAC is in the process of redesigning all MSP restrooms with the environment and patrons in mind. The estimated water savings from the restrooms redesigned to date is approximately seven million gallons per year! Bathrooms also incorporate LED lighting, but use daylighting when possible.

The MAC has also taken measures to increase accessibility to those with disabilities, such as speaker and thermal cues when a restroom is closed for cleaning. They’ve also added four lactation rooms, one nursing room with one under construction, and service animal and pet relief rooms at MSP.

Local and Sustainable Businesses

The MAC features a variety of local and sustainable businesses within the airport, furthering their sustainability goals. Below are just a few of them.

  • Open Book: A collaboration between the Loft Literary Center, Milkweed Editions, and the Minnesota Center for Book Arts, this local non-profit offers MSP travelers an ever-changing selection of the latest books, as well as an eclectic assortment of gifts and artwork.
  • LoLo: This locally-owned, locally-operated restaurant in MSP changes 40% of its menu with change in seasons, and serves locally-sourced food and drink.
  • Angel Food Bakery and Doughnut Bar: The MAC sets goals for bringing in Airport Concession Disadvantaged Business Enterprises; this woman-owned bakery is one such business, serving amazing items made from locally-sourced ingredients
  • Hammer Made: This specialty men’s shop offers distinctive, limited-run shirts and accessories by a local designer. The limited runs reduce fabric use, and any extra fabric is used as shirt trim or made into boxer shorts.
  • Stone Arch: With a concept developed by a local Minneapolis team, Stone Arch offers numerous kinds of local craft beer in partnership with the Minnesota Craft Brewers Guild

Organics

All concessionaires at MSP– in Terminal 1-Lindbergh and Terminal 2-Humphrey– participate in the MAC’s MSP back-of-house organics composting program. The MAC was able to divert and compost 354 tons of organics in 2016 through partnership with MSP concessionaires. In addition, 91.4 tons of used cooking oil was recycled, and 1,520 tons of other material were recycled or diverted in 2016.

You can learn more about the MAC and MSP’s sustainability efforts by reading their 2016 sustainability report, available here »

Sam Hanson

POSTED BY:

Director, Sustainability Program

Paris Withdrawal Won’t Stop Business Sustainability

June 27th, 2017

In the wake of the United States leaving the Paris Climate Agreements, many states, cities, and individual companies have taken pledges to continue sustainability efforts. In Minnesota, we’re lucky to have major companies and thought leaders stand firm in their commitment to environmental protection, including many members of the Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition.

In an effort to work toward a circular economy, environmental protection and stewardship must be a high priority. Several Coalition members have issued public statements and/or been in public support of the Paris Climate Agreements, demonstrating the leadership in our community on environmental issues.

The fact is, a commitment to the Paris Agreements, and more broadly our environment, is a smart business decision no matter your priorities.

STAYING GLOBALLY COMPETITIVE

One of the main reasons that companies and government entities are still following through with climate promises is to stay competitive. Cargill issued a statement reflecting their need to remain globally competitive, concluding that the Paris accords impact “trade, economic vitality, the state of our environment, and relationships amongst the world community.” Because of this, CEO David MacLennan said Cargill will not back away from efforts
to reduce climate change.

General Mills and several leading companies (Google, Walmart, Unilever, and more) echoed that sentiment with a letter to the President to express why the Paris Climate Agreements are important to their ability to compete globally: “the agreement ensures a more balanced global effort, reducing the risk of competitive imbalances for U.S. companies.”

INNOVATION & OPEN MARKETS

Part of being globally competitive is practicing innovation. The Paris Climate Agreements helped companies to innovate and create technologies that lower business costs. That new technology allows companies to enter new markets and keep markets open. Dow commented on how they will act in light of the executive decision, saying they will “continue to advocate for smart policies that enable the reduction of global greenhouse gas emissions and ensure that global markets stay open to American exports and innovation.”

Thomson Reuters also commented on the importance of climate innovation: “In short, having a sustainability strategy integrated into your business model is an efficiency, growth and innovation driver.”

COMMITTING TO CUSTOMERS

In addition to economic arguments, Xcel Energy made a more values-driven appeal. In an op-ed, Xcel’s CEO calls out the value of their customers, and responding to their interests in achieving a higher standard of environmental protection. As a result, Xcel is already on a “path to reduce carbon emissions by 45%
by 2021, well ahead of the U.S.-Paris commitment.”

Best Buy also highlighted what they’re doing in response to customer interests, saying, “Best Buy is focused on reducing our own carbon impact, and helping our customers use less energy as well… Collective action will result in a healthier world for generations to come.”

THE BOTTOM LINE

In the end, Minnesota businesses and corporations are dedicated to the environment for more than just regulatory reasons. Investing in environmental protection is a smart business decision. Even more than that, private-sector leaders see lessened environmental protections as harmful to their organizations and global markets as a whole.

These businesses, our state, and many others are still committed to action on the environment. It’s because of that leadership that we can still look forward to climate action for years to come.

Sam Hanson

POSTED BY:

Director, Sustainability Program

Member of the Month: Wenck

June 5th, 2017

Wenck is excited and honored to be featured as Environmental Initiative’s member of the month for June, and it is our pleasure to congratulate Environmental Initiative on its 25th Anniversary. Having just celebrated 30 years in the business ourselves, we understand how meaningful a milestone like 25 years is.

Throughout the years, Wenck has and continues to make a significant investment sponsoring Environmental Initiative. Why? Because Environmental Initiative is about delivering positive outcomes through collaboration and partnership which directly resonates with our core values. Both Wenck and Environmental Initiative are outcome-oriented organizations which focus on providing solutions that benefit the environment, the organizations we serve, as well as the communities we serve in. This alignment of values and outcomes is significantly enhanced through the connectedness that Environmental Initiative fosters like no other.

Wenck is proud to be a sponsor of Environmental Initiative’s Policy Forum Series, the Business and Environment Series, as well as a founding member of the Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition.  All three platforms are rooted within Environmental Initiative, and together, and separately, help to educate, ideate, connect, and deliver positive and sustaining benefits to the region.

Congratulations again on 25 amazing years. On behalf of all of us at Wenck, we look forward to another 25 years of partnership, collaboration, and delivery of exceptional outcomes.


Each month, we feature information about one of our members on the Initiative blog and on our website. Contact Sacha Seymour-Anderson anytime at 612-334-3388 ext. 8108 to learn more about this membership benefit.

Bill Brown

POSTED BY:

Vice President, Wenck

Sitting Down with an Emerging Leader: Eliza Clark

May 10th, 2017

In honor of our 25th anniversary, we’re taking the time to honor those who’ve been essential and influential in Minnesota’s environmental community. In addition to celebrating outstanding projects, we’re also recognizing the leaders that have helped us get to this point, and those that will continue to improve our community.

Eliza Clark is the Director of Sustainability and Environmental at Andersen Corporation and this year’s Emerging Leader Award recipient. In her role, she’s responsible for developing and advancing programs that measurably reduce environmental impacts across the company’s value chain.

Eliza Clark (pictured right) and Andersen sustainability team members

However, she also believes that there are some problems organizations can’t solve by themselves, which has led her to seek groundbreaking solutions. Known for reaching outside of her organization’s four walls, she has also served as a founding member of the Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition, acting Vice Chair of Super Bowl LII’s Sustainability Committee, an Environmental Initiative board member, and co-founder of the Sustainability Practitioner’s Roundtable. You can read more about her here »

As part of the festivities, I got to sit down with Eliza and talk about her career, her team, and her advice for those currently working on environmental issues.

SITTING DOWN WITH ELIZA CLARK

What excites you about the environmental community, sector, or movement in Minnesota?

One thing that I’m excited about right now is that we are starting to work across all sectors. We haven’t always had the best cross-sector, public-private dialogue or cross pollination, and I think that sometimes causes misunderstandings. Working with a diverse set of businesses, government entities, NGOs and academics really could be the “secret sauce” to solving our most complex problems.

In the private sector, though, organizations committed to sustainability have been meeting, sharing, and collaborating on work and best practices for many years. We have a really robust network of people that genuinely like each other and are willing to be very honest about challenges. I think it’s fun to see all of us come together and be more action-oriented, which really was the genesis of the Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition. We have a strong foundation of people helping each other and working together, and now poignantly understand that there are problems that we can’t solve as individual organizations. I think that nexus of energy and influence is really powerful.

I also think that there is actually a lot of optimism right now. It was a very difficult election season with a lot of negativity and divisiveness, but in the end, we all feel like there are some important economic factors that are driving things like better access to renewable energy or more energy-efficient technology for manufacturing. It feels like we’re on the cusp of being able to do some transformational things.

What does partnership or collaboration mean to you? Why is it necessary?

I think collaboration is really the reason I want to get up in the morning and do the work that I do! All day every day, I’m basically trying to convince people to change the way they do things, often making their lives harder. I think the primary reason that it’s fun—because it is fun—is that I get to build relationships and work through challenges collaboratively. I think a core part of the human experience is that nothing feels better than solving a tough problem or achieving some kind of landmark that you really had to struggle to get to. A lot of my work is like that. Once you get to the mountain with a group of people, it feels that much more rewarding. I’m really grateful for the work that I get to do within my company and outside of it.

Partnership and consensus isn’t always easy. What lessons have you learned so far?

What I’ve learned at this point in my career is that collaborative problem solving is not all about making everybody happy. Truly difficult environmental problems have tradeoffs, and so that depth and intersection is incredibly challenging to “solve.”

My style of partnering has really changed to not just go directly to a solution, which is tempting, and instead to spend more time on the front-end. I work with stakeholders to understand the history of the problem and why people want something to be a certain way, and then taking that heart and those passions to have an open and candid dialogue with all parties about what they might lose or gain by making big choices.

Notably, I’m not positioning that process as having one, perfect solution. How most of those problems are solved is through compromise and through an honest assessment of tradeoffs. We have to collaboratively agree on accepting or not accepting those conditions.

What successes are you most proud of in your career?

I was very proud to help my company declare its first set of public sustainability goals and to announce its signing of the Ceres Climate Declaration. I’m also very proud to have led Andersen to sign up to up to 19 megawatts of community solar subscriptions, which is a pretty significant amount of renewable energy. That feels very meaningful to me at a national level.

But honestly, for me, it’s the journey and not the various outcomes. I’m just proud of the work that my team and my peers do every day because most of it is not glamorous—it’s just chugging through it! Making sure things get done and then measuring what’s happening… it’s more just the fact that we remain committed to the mission and the environment, and that we want to keep going together.

What advice would you give your peers working in the environmental sector? What advice do you give to young women working on environmental issues?

Generally, I think we all need to do a better job of understanding social, financial, and human implications of potential projects and really how human behavior affects what we’re trying to achieve. We need to have that holistic understanding of the problem and then identify key working partners and other leaders that can help advance solutions.

Speaking about young women, sometimes we aren’t bold enough. I think sometimes we decide ahead of time what we can and cannot achieve. I recently spoke at the Women in Green Power Breakfast (a program by the U.S Green Building Council) and my primary message was to ‘fail forward.’ We have a lot of capacity within us, and if you know your stuff and the broader implications of what you’re advocating for, then don’t be afraid to be a champion regardless of our role in the hierarchy.

Damian Goebel

POSTED BY:

Communications Director

Meet Stephanie Weir, Project Manager

April 26th, 2017

Hi, there! I’m Stephanie Weir. I’m excited to join Environmental Initiative to support the Sustainability Program as Project Manager.

My work at Environmental Initiative will be focused on the Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition where I will be assisting the group’s clean energy work. I’ll also provide project leadership and management on the Business and Environment Series, an upcoming business-to-business mentorship program, and other emerging Sustainability Program projects.

For the past three and a half years, I served as Program Manager at St. Paul Smart Trips. There, I led the organization’s bicycle advocacy, education, and community building work through St. Paul Women on Bikes (WOB)— a coalition of women, families, and organizations working to make it safer and easier to ride a bike in St. Paul. Similar to Environmental Initiative, this work utilized a positive, coalition-based approach.

With more than a decade of nonprofit and community organizing experience, as well as a Master of Nonprofit Management, I have learned that strong relationships and creative partnerships are key to systems-change work.

More personally, I grew up romping through the woods, climbing trees, and catching fireflies in a small town in rural Michigan. From early-morning fishing to afternoon swims to gazing up at the stars, my childhood was defined by the natural world. After graduating from Kalamazoo College in 2005, I moved to Minneapolis and immediately fell in love with the way the Twin Cities embraces nature in the midst of an urban environment. Whether it’s riding my bike to the Quaking Bog at Theodore Wirth Park, exploring the banks of the Mississippi with Ulu (the cutest dog in the whole world), or getting dirt under my fingernails planting cucamelons in my backyard, there is no shortage of time spent outdoors.

To me, Environmental Initiative’s mission is both personally and professionally important. In every position I’ve held, cross-sector partnerships have always been a centerpiece, so I know I’m going to fit in here. I look forward to getting to know the great people and organizations that make up the Environmental Initiative community!

Stephanie Weir

POSTED BY:

Project Manager

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