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Posts Tagged ‘Environmental Initaitive Awards’

Rice Creek Commons is Common Sense— Meet the Natural Resource Winners

April 25th, 2017

The Natural Resources category award is given to collaborative efforts that implement sustainable solutions to preserve, protect, or restore Minnesota’s land, water, biological diversity, and other natural resources.

In the land of 10,000 lakes, you can see why recognizing efforts to restore waterways and landscapes is so important.

Ramsey County, the City of Arden Hills, Wenck Associates, Inc. and many other partners are currently working to restore a piece of polluted land that has been around since World War II: The Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant.

AMMUNITION PLANT TO  VIBRANT COMMUNITY

 

 

Four years ago, Ramsey County purchased a contaminated parcel of land in Arden Hills with the goal of making it a community asset. The land once held the Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant, built to manufacture small arms ammunition during World War II, and had sat dormant for nearly four decades. Partnering with the City of Arden Hills, the county began redeveloping the brownfield into a livable space for homes and businesses.

Over a 32-month period, existing buildings were demolished, and the soil was remediated to residential standards. We removed hazardous waste and recycled or reused materials like concrete and asphalt. This past summer, the county collaborated with the Rice Creek Watershed District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and Minnesota Department of Natural Resources to transform Rice Creek, which runs through the site, back to its original, meandering path and stabilize it with surrounding trees and plants.

With the site demolished and soil restored to residential standards, infrastructure construction is set to begin this year. Soon Rice Creek Commons (named after the site’s stream) will be a walkable, vibrant commercial and residential development, creating economic and social opportunity for Arden Hills and the region.

FROM THE PROJECT PARTNERS

“When the county purchased the land, it was the largest superfund site in Minnesota. The large cost and difficulty associated with cleaning up the site had discouraged previous developers for many years. Because the property presented unique challenges, the Ramsey County Board of Commissioners recognized the land would probably stay polluted and empty for many more years unless they took action.

The project is also unique in that Ramsey County is a fully developed county. With few opportunities to grow and increase the area’s tax base, developments like Rice Creek Commons present an important opportunity for economic development.” – Heather Worthington, Deputy County Manager

“I’m proud that this project respects the history of the site and what was there before. Redeveloping the area is about honoring its past and making it a safe, economic engine once again.” – Heather Worthington, Deputy County Manager

Read the Pioneer Press piece: A cheer for Rice Creek Commons »

CELEBRATE THIS EFFORT

Join us on Thursday, May 25 to congratulate and celebrate these project partners, their positive environmental outcomes, and the lasting benefit of collaboration. To shake things up, we’re also honoring three individuals in honor of our 25th anniversary, so it’s sure to be a night of reflection and festivities for Minnesota’s environmental community. Purchase your tickets or tables here »

 


A note from Environmental Initiative:
In honor of Environmental Initiative’s 25th Anniversary, four organizational and two individual awards will be presented on May 25, 2017 at the Nicollet Island Pavilion. Get your tickets before they’re gone »

Damian Goebel

POSTED BY:

Communications Director

Hooray for Hutchinson! Meet the Energy & Climate Winners

April 18th, 2017

The Energy and Climate category award is given to a partnership that reduces greenhouse gas emissions, cuts energy consumption, advances energy efficiency, or improves air quality. It’s projects like these that prepare our state to adapt to a changing global climate.

The City of Hutchinson, Ameresco, Xcel Energy and many more partners came together in a cross-sector partnership to do just that. Through this solar project, the City reduced emissions in their community, making a better quality of life for residents and our planet. Not only is this project innovative and groundbreaking, it transformed one of Minnesota’s brown areas blue. Join us in congratulating these project partners!

A FIRST FOR MINNESOTA

 

Made possible by a generous Renewable Development Fund grant from Xcel Energy, The City of Hutchinson Landfill Solar Photovoltaic (PV) System is a 400-kilowatt system supplying 15% of the power needs of the City’s Wastewater Treatment Plant. This project is the largest solar PV installation on a landfill in Minnesota, and the first ballast-mounted on a brownfield.

In layman’s terms, not only was this mounted and installed in an innovative way, it also transformed a landfill into something restorative that gives back to the community in cost savings, and to the state in environmental benefit. As a result of repurposing a 1970s-era municipal landfill, the City reduced CO2 emissions by 1.4 million pounds per year, roughly the equivalent of taking 133 vehicles off the road each year.

FROM THE PROJECT PARTNERS

“The City of Hutchinson was able to make Minnesota’s first landfill mounted Solar PV project possible through strong partnerships with Xcel Energy, AMERESCO, Hutchinson Utilities, tenKsolar, Hunt Electric, and many more,” said Hutchinson Mayor Gary Forcier. “Being recognized by Environmental Initiative for this project affirms the importance of this unique collaboration and that our City’s commitment to innovation can foster resounding benefits to our residents as well as others across the state and region.”

“The electrical energy produced by the solar panels provides enough dollar savings such that the project is guaranteed to pay for itself in less than 18 years, and with an estimated life of over 30 years; the City and residents will receive all the financial benefits in future years.” —John Neville, AMERESCO

CELEBRATE THIS EFFORT

Join us on Thursday, May 25 to congratulate and celebrate these project partners, their positive environmental outcomes, and the lasting benefit of collaboration. To shake things up, we’re also honoring three individuals in honor of our 25th anniversary, so it’s sure to be a night of reflection and festivities for Minnesota’s environmental community. Purchase your tickets or tables here »

 

 

 


A note from Environmental Initiative:
In honor of Environmental Initiative’s 25th Anniversary, four organizational and two individual awards will be presented on May 25, 2017 at the Nicollet Island Pavilion. Get your tickets before they’re gone »

Damian Goebel

POSTED BY:

Communications Director

Have you met the Community Action category winners?

April 13th, 2017

The Community Action category award is given to partnerships that solve environmental challenges on a community scale—which can mean a lot of things. From grassroots efforts and utilizing volunteers, to policy initiatives that contribute to improved quality of life, this award recognizes those who come together.

The Metropolitan Council, the Metro Clean Energy Resource Team (CERTs), a slew of local governments, and many more project partners came together to produce solid environmental and economic outcomes—making them this year’s Community Action winner.

An Award-Winning Effort

 

 

The Governmental Solar Garden Collaborative is a joint effort by and for 31 local governments in the greater Twin Cities metropolitan region to procure solar garden subscriptions from a single Request for Proposals (RFP) process. The goal in getting these subscriptions is to offset the energy usage at public facilities.

The results? Twenty-four of the 31 participants said that they were moving to sign subscription agreements for a cumulative 33 megawatts of solar capacity. If you’re like me, you have no idea what this means.

Basically, most participating local governments are working to offset public facility energy use by signing up for a clean energy alternative. By doing so, these local governments have added a surprising figure of solar capacity to the state. To give you an idea of how meaningful 33 megawatts is, Minnesota generated a total of 35 megawatts for community solar subscriptions during the entirety of 2015.

Perhaps more importantly, this project highlights the power of partnership—and its lasting benefit. Because of this effort, the group is continuing conversations concerning additional collaborative purchasing for public building solar and electric vehicles for local government fleets.

FROM THE PROJECT PARTNERS

“By working together and sharing resources, the partners could reduce costs, create opportunities for communities of all sizes, and make a larger impact than any organization could have had alone. The result will be the development of 33 megawatts of solar electricity– enough to power over 4,000 Minnesota homes for 25 years– and a significant reduction of government spending on energy in public facilities.” –Trevor Drake, Co-Director of the Metro Clean Energy Resource Team and Project Manager at Great Plains Institute.

“What will have long lasting impact is how public and private entities combined their knowledge, skills and expertise to generate subscriptions to 33 MW of solar development… This type of procurement for solar energy was a groundbreaking, innovative approach that has applied across the nation in only a few regions.” –Peter Lindstrom, Local Government Outreach Coordinator with the Clean Energy Resource Teams (CERTs) at the University of Minnesota’s Regional Sustainable Development Partnerships and Extension.

“I’m most proud of the willingness and determination of everyone involved to try something new. It’s easy to look back at something that was successful and be glad to have done it. It’s much more difficult, however, to move forward with something that seems like a good idea but might not succeed. Everyone involved in this project took a risk in joining the process and seeing it through. I’m proud that our region is made up of local governments and partners that are willing and determined to be innovative in the face of great challenges.” –Trevor Drake, Co-Director of the Metro Clean Energy Resource Team and Project Manager at Great Plains Institute.

CELEBRATE THIS EFFORT

Join us on Thursday, May 25 to congratulate and celebrate these project partners, their positive environmental outcomes, and the lasting benefit of collaboration. To shake things up, we’re also honoring three individuals in honor of our 25th anniversary, so it’s sure to be a night of reflection and festivities for Minnesota’s environmental community. Purchase your tickets or tables here »

 

 

 


A note from Environmental Initiative:
In honor of Environmental Initiative’s 25th Anniversary, four organizational and two individual awards will be presented on May 25, 2017 at the Nicollet Island Pavilion. Get your tickets before they’re gone »

Damian Goebel

POSTED BY:

Communications Director

Winners Announced at 2016 Environmental Initiative Awards Ceremony

May 27th, 2016

At Environmental Initiative, we create a safe space where people with different perspectives come together to learn, discuss, reach agreement, and implement environmental solutions in partnership. It’s no easy task bringing together unlikely partners to solve environmental problems. We created the Environmental Initiative Awards to honor those working in the spirit of our mission and to inspire others to collaborate.

Without further ado, here are the 2016 Environmental Initiative Award winners. Congratulations to all of the individuals and organizations involved in these outstanding projects!

Also, be sure to check out some of the great photos and social media posts shared live at the event.

2016 Partnership of the YearAgPlastic

Recycling Agricultural/Marine Plastics
With the use of plastic films on the rise, a diverse group of stakeholders identified and established environmentally and economically sustainable methods for properly managing agricultural (like bale wraps) and boat plastic wrap waste.

Community ActionSun Ray Library

Sun Ray Nature-Smart Library
The newly renovated Sun Ray Library is changing the way the community thinks about literacy, environmental stewardship, and youth leadership by becoming a hub for nature learning and recreation. The library transformed both its physical environment and programming to serve as a place for families to learn and engage with nature.

Energy & ClimateTheRose526

The Rose
A model of the next generation of multifamily housing, The Rose successfully  incorporated ultra-sustainable design, energy efficiency, and healthy building materials into a Minneapolis apartment complex accessible to low-income families.

Environmental EducationRace2Reduce

Race 2 Reduce
Race 2 Reduce is engaging the public and educating youth in the surrounding communities of White Bear Lake on the importance of local water conservation. Last year, Race 2 Reduce reached over 2,155 students and 870 adult community members and engaged more than 62 classrooms and 5 clubs.

Food StewardshipFeastLocalFoods

Feast! Local Foods Network
The Feast! Local Foods Network is a partnership committed to growing a sustainable, local and regional food system. While Feast! works to expand markets for local foods businesses and helps those businesses to grow, it also encourages businesses to move towards environmentally-responsible practices.

Natural ResourcesCoffeeCreek

Coffee Creek Daylighting and Restoration
Project partners restored a severely damaged section of Coffee Creek in the City of Duluth. The new stream channel provides valuable habitat for trout, is more resilient for future flood events, and promotes sustainable redevelopment of urban land.

Sustainable Business

Metropolitan Airports Commission’s Sustainable Solar PV and LED Lighting Project
The Metropolitan Airports Commission and Ameresco partnered to install the largest (non-utility) solar PV project in Minnesota and the largest integrated solar and lighting project at a U.S. airport.MAC - Blog

Congratulations again to all of the finalists and this year’s winning projects. Be sure to share the good news about your favorite project on social media by using #16EIAwards.

—————–

The Environmental Initiative Awards annually honor innovative projects that have achieved extraordinary environmental results by harnessing the power of partnership. From large statewide efforts to small-scale locally based projects, many of Minnesota’s most innovative environmental efforts have succeeded as a result of collaboration.

Nominations for the 2017 Environmental Initiative Awards will open in January.

Andrea Robbins

POSTED BY:

Director, Engagement and Systems

Grateful on #GivingTuesday

November 30th, 2015

I’ve been with this organization for nine years. Seriously. How did that happen? Ultimately, I came (and stayed) because I believe in the work Environmental Initiative is trying to do. The world can be a crazy complicated place and the environmental problems we face, and are trying to address, are just as thorny.

Like it or not we’ve all had a hand in creating the environmental problems affecting the world. You can’t remove the link be2015-11-12 12.22.01tween our natural resources and the economy. You can’t remove the connection between our environment and our communities and our health. So isn’t it up to all of us to work together with all of these connections and complexities in mind – to come up with feasible solutions? This is what Environmental Initiative is all about.

I’m extremely grateful for the individuals and organizations that support Environmental Initiative financially. Over the past year, you’ve made work like this possible. You’ve also supported and helped make possible a few of the things I’m most proud of during my time with the organization:

Funding for Parks & Trails
I don’t think I’ve ever sweat bullets as seriously as I did during the final meeting of our Parks & Trails Legacy Funding work group. Leaders reached an agreement on how to fairly divide constitutionally dedicated funds for Minnesota parks and trails across the state in the final moments of our final meeting together. Whew! I’m so proud of managing that project and for having the privilege to work with such a dedicated, smart group of people.

Project Green Fleet
Did you know I was once a school bus retrofit sales-lady? One of my first jobs at this organization was to hop on the phone and convince school districts across the state they should give us access to their school buses so certified equipment manufacturers could install pollution control equipment to reduce emissions. Nearly 5,000 engines later we’re still at it. And, now I have the extremely fun job of helping to tell those stories. Did you know our latest project was a 38 year-old tugboat? Insane!

Environmental Initiative Awards

The very first project I managed at Environmental Initiative was the Environmental Initiative Awards. Honestly? What could be more fun than this? We get to hear about environmental success stories from across the state and recognize them at a HUGE party each May. One of the best parts of being attached to Environmental Initiative is this event. (Mark your calendars, the 2016 party is on May 26th).

Not only am I (still) on staff, I’m also an individual member. I support Environmental Initiative financially because our way of bringing people together to find common ground and solutions that can work for everyone – it’s the way we should be trying to solve more of our problems. If you agree, we could use your support!

Between now & December 31, 2015 we’re trying to raise $15,000 from individuals like you. We’ve got about $9,000 to raise to meet our goal. There are two easy ways to donate and either way your contribution will be matched by our current and past board of directors:

I hope you will join me and invest in this work by becoming an individual member. To those of you who already are? THANK YOU for supporting Environmental Initiative’s efforts to work together to solve problems.

Emily Franklin

POSTED BY:

Director of Communications
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