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Minneapolis recognized nationally for Green Business Cost Sharing Program

August 23rd, 2016

A big congratulations are in order for the City of Minneapolis!

Earlier this month, the National Association of County and City Health Officials’ (NACCHO) awarded the Model Practice Award to the City of Minneapolis. The national award honors the city’s Green Business Cost Sharing Program. The Green Business Cost Sharing Program was one of 23 local health department programs across the nation to receive NACCHO’s prestigious Model Practice Award.

The program offers funds to small businesses to make equipment conversions and adopt other practices that reduce emissions, which impact air quality. Emissions from these smaller, more dispersed sources aren’t regulated like power plants or other large facilities. Because of this, smaller area sources like auto body shops or printing facilities are a growing concern for our region.

The Green Business Cost Sharing Program is unique in that it treats businesses as a potential partner to address pollution. According to city officials, since 2013, the program has reduced pollution from entering Minneapolis air by nearly 12 tons.

Along with the City of Minneapolis, Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, and Minnesota Technical Assistance Program, Environmental Initiative is a proud partner in the Green Business Cost Share Program through Clean Air Minnesota, a statewide public-private partnership to improve air quality.

For more information, visit www.minneapolismn.gov/greenbusiness.

 

 

Bill Droessler

POSTED BY:

Senior Director of Strategic Project Planning

What Does it Mean to “Advance a Circular Economy?”

August 15th, 2016

I stumbled across this quote the other day from Albert Einstein, “If you can’t explain it SIMPLY, you don’t understand it well enough.” This resonated so much with me, I put it on a post-it and stuck it on my office wall. So, what does my office decorating endeavors have to do with a circular economy?

The idea of a circular economy is one of those sort of gnarly, complicated concepts. Especially when you to try to apply it in a real world scenario. But, let’s break it down. To put it simply, a circular economy is an economy that works like nature does. Minnesota Public Radio’s Elizabeth Dunbar captured the idea nicely in a recent article:

“Imagine yourself in a native prairie. Birds and insects feed on plants. When they die, they decompose and nourish the soil. The prairie lifecycle forms a circle, where waste from one species is used by another, year after year.”

In the case of a prairie, forest, or other ecosystem, everything is a resource and there is no waste. Our economy is the opposite. We extract natural resources, use those resources to make stuff, we use the stuff we make, and then we throw it away. And, our current “take, make, dispose” model is reaching its physical limitations – as natural resources become scarce and more expensive to extract. This video from the Ellen MacArthur Foundation provides a four-minute crash course.

Earlier this summer, more than twenty-five companies and organizations announced the Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition. The purpose of the partnership is to re-imagine business as usual through the acceleration and advancement of a thriving circular economy. It’s a big vision, a huge task.

But, what does that mean and what will it take? How can a business (or a group of businesses) really help advance our global, linear economic system to a circular one? Coalition members are working together to help figure it out. In the meantime, we’ll spare you all of the theory (and plethora of diagrams about what a circular economy is and how it could work). Instead, here are a couple of inspiring examples of circular projects in action:

TEQUILA AND CARS

In a truly unlikely pairing, Ford Motor Company will collaborate with Jose Cuervo to use discarded agave plant fibers leftover from tequila production in place of plastic to build things like fuse boxes and cup holders in cars. Cheers to that. Read the full story>>

OLD TIRES, NEW KICKS

Did you know that the footwear and tire industries are two of the biggest users of virgin rubber? In another unique pairing, Timberland and Omni United (a tire manufacturer) worked together to develop tires for cars and trucks that can be recycled into soles for boots and shoes. Treads that go on and on? Cool.

Later this month, the Minnesota Sustainable Growth Coalition will be identifying specific clean energy projects to pursue. What do you think this group of companies and organizations could do together? Share your circular economy inspired ideas in the comments below.

Emily Franklin

POSTED BY:

Director of Communications

Meet Rachel Dupree, Communications Associate

August 11th, 2016

Hi, everyone!

My name is Rachel Dupree and I’m joining the Environmental Initiative team as a Communications Associate. I’m super excited to be part of the work that’s happening here!

RachelI’m a recent graduate of Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa, but I was born and raised in the greater Twin Cities area.  At Drake, I earned degrees in Public Relations and International Relations with a concentration in Global Public Health. I know that sounds like a weird combination—it is. If I could’ve majored in social justice, I would have, but here we are.

My environmental career started with a study abroad trip, actually. I spent a month in Ecuador my junior year, and while it was life changing in a lot of ways, it was also eye opening. After hiking for five days in the Amazon, myself and 15 other students toured the less awe-inspiring parts of the forest: the deforestation efforts and the indigenous farms impacted.  Meeting with community members from deep in the jungle and hearing their life experiences was sobering to say the least.

Those images lead me to the environmental sector. As an undergraduate, I worked for one of Iowa’s largest land and water conservation groups, the Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation (INHF). My main function was to spread awareness and convey the importance of conserving Iowa’s natural prairies, community trails, and threatened wildlife. Additionally, I was part of the communications team at the World Food Prize Foundation (WFP) in Des Moines, an organization most noted for awarding the “Nobel Peace Prize for agriculture” to those who tackle global food scarcity.

Now, I’m happily back in my home state and ready to continue my work in the environmental sector with a stellar organization. I’m sure you’ll be hearing from me!

 

Rachel Dupree

POSTED BY:

Communications Associate

Meet Waste Management: August Member of the Month

August 2nd, 2016

TCMRFWasteSort

Waste Management has been a proud member and sponsor of Environmental Initiative since 2009. In the past, Waste Management was the Series Sponsor of the Business & Environment Series, which helped Environmental Initiative grow the program into what it is today.  Waste Management has also been a sponsor of the Environmental Initiative Awards. We are so happy for their continued membership support.

Waste Management: Embracing the Circular Economy

The concept of recycling discarded materials back into the manufacturing process is a no-brainer.  Instead of mining new resources, this “Circular Economy” mindset urges us to use and reuse materials time and again, recycling them and reusing them, in a closed loop of innovations. Avoiding the mining and extraction of new materials reduces demands on natural resources and reduces the carbon and other emissions that result from the manufacturing process. The concept works particularly well for metals, which are almost indefinitely reusable. For products like paper and metal, resource reuse is also generally cheaper than use of virgin materials.bale of crushed cans

But there’s more to the circular economy. The value lies not just in completing the circle, but in what you gain along the way. A functioning circular economy helps to continually reduce emissions and other environmental impacts. Waste, including residual waste, is reduced as is the use of non-renewable energies in traditional manufacture.

It’s important to remember that the concept of a circular economy remains, after all, an “economy”.  There are market forces to be reckoned with, including unpredictable externalities and shifting public demand. And, when we consider all of our daily activities, by far the most important is to avoid producing waste in the first place. Through waste reduction, we produce fewer waste related impacts to manage and we save money.  Our Waste Management Sustainability Services, Public Sector Services and Manufacturing and Industrial teams focus on how we can all better protect the environment by working with customers to reduce the waste they generate. For these customers, we become the “Zero-Waste Management” company.

Waste Management of Minnesota

Waste Management is Minnesota’s largest recycling and waste services provider in Minnesota, recycling nearly 250,000 tons of material per year at the Twin Cities Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) in Minneapolis. The Twin Cities MRF is the top Waste Management performing recycling facility of over 100 Waste Management facilities.

Waste Management also provides premium waste collection services and disposal facilities that meet all state and federal requirements for environmental protection.

With the largest network of recycling facilities, transfer stations and landfills in the nation, Waste Management’s entire business can adapt to meet the needs of every distinct customer group.

For more on Waste Management’s sustainability efforts visit http://www.wm.com/sustainability.

Thank you, Waste Management for your continued support of Environmental Initiative and we look forward to our future partnerships.

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Each month, we feature information about one of our members on the Initiative blog and on our website. Contact Sacha Seymour-Anderson anytime at 612-334-3388 ext. 8108 to learn more about this membership benefit.

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Sacha Seymour-Anderson

POSTED BY:

Development Director

Air Pollution Advisory: Five Things You Can Do

July 20th, 2016

With this week’s heat wave in full swing, forecasts for ground level ozone, or smog, are forecast to spike, peaking this Friday with an air quality index of 101, a level classified as “Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups.” The air quality levels have triggered the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency to issue an air pollution advisory for the Twin Cities Metro and some outlying areas. While ozone is essential for life when it exists 10 to 30 miles above the earth’s surface in the stratosphere, ozone at ground level can best be compared to a sunburn on the lungs, causing irritation, triggering asthma, and contributing to reduced lung function over time.air alert map

Why does the spike coincide with the heat wave, you might ask? Ground level ozone, or smog, forms when Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) (pollutants from wood burning and internal combustion engines) react with volatile organic compounds (VOC’s) (what you smell when paint dries, when you fuel up, or when you have a bonfire) in the presence of heat and sunlight. With this week bringing an abundance of both heat and sunlight, the reactions that create smog will be running in high gear.

The good news is that there are some easy things that we can all do can do before or on air alert days to reduce  pollution and help us all breathe easier.

Reduce single-occupancy vehicle trips
Cars are a source of both VOCs and NOx, especially if they are in need of a tune-up. Consider avoiding single-occupancy trips by carpooling, taking public transit, or working from home on poor air quality days. Taking your car into the mechanic? Have them check to make sure your car’s pollution controls are running smoothly.

Avoid Burning Wood
Wood fires, both recreational and for heating purposes, are a substantial source of VOC’s, NOx, and particulate matter (another harmful pollutant). Skip the bonfire and go for a swim on air alert days.

Re-fuel after 6 p.m.
The smell of gasoline is actually the smell of volatile organic compounds that come out of your gas tank when you fill it up. By waiting to fuel up, you can avoid VOC emissions during the heat of the day when ozone formation is at its peak.

Postpone lawn/landscape maintenance
Small, two-stroke engines like those on most lawn equipment, can be a substantial source of both VOCs and NOx. In addition, cut grass itself emits VOCs. Consider holding off on mowing until the heat wave passes and save yourself a wicked sunburn.

Reduce/Defer use of Paints, Solvents, and other VOC-containing products
The volatile organic compounds in paints and solvents allow them to dry quickly and do their job, but they go into the atmosphere as they evaporate. Painting with a 105-degree heat index is no fun anyway, so consider holding off on that household project.

Have questions or want to learn more about what you can do to reduce your air pollution impact? Check on air quality forecasts on the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency’s website and consider signing up for alert e-mails and downloading their mobile app.

Visit Environmental Initiative’s website to learn about what Clean Air Minnesota partners are doing on an ongoing basis to improve air quality and how you can help.

Air pollution advisory map credit:  Minnesota Pollution Control Agency

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Mikey Weitekamp

POSTED BY:

Senior Project Manager, Environmental Initiative

A Big Mid-Year Campaign Thank You

July 12th, 2016

Thank you, thank you, thank you!  A BIG thank you goes out to the more than 85 individuals who donated to Environmental Initiative during our first ever mid-year individual donor campaign.  We raised $8,625 in just four weeks and we can’t wait to put these dollars to great use.2015-11-12 13.21.57

We really could not do our work without help from all the individuals listed below and everyone else who gives to Environmental Initiative throughout the year. On behalf of everyone here at Environmental Initiative, thank you all again and happy summer!

Thank you mid-year campaign donors:

DyAnn Andybur
Cindy Angerhofer
Emily Balogh
Marian Bender
Peter Berglund
Ginny Black
Patti Brown
Alison Byrant
Rick Carter
Mikel Cashin
Anne Clanton
David Crisman
Eric David
Megan Dobratz
Greg Downing
Kathryn Draeger
Chris Duffy
Brett Emmons
Judy Erickson
Joe Erjavec
Dick Fowler
Nick Franco
Emily Franklin
Robert Friend
Mark Friske
Denis Fuchs
Margaret George
Debbie Goettel
Bill Grant
Lloyd Grooms
Bill Hefner
Erin Heitkamp
Calder Hibbard
James Hietala
Heather Ilse
John Jaschke
Jan Joannides
Kevin Johnson
Jeremy Kalin
Sam Ketchum
Mark Kjolhaug
Tim Koehler
Stephen Korstad
Kirk Koudelka
Anne Kraft
Charley Kubler
Tony Kwilas
Tom Landwehr
Heidi Larson
Jeff Ledermann
Eric Lillyblad
Charlie Lippert
Judy Lissick
Lorrie Louder
Linda Meschke
Sally Mills
Tim Montgomery
Pat Mulloy
Chris Nelson
Lee Nelson
Terrylea Ness
Keith Newhouse
Rolf Nordstrom
Miluska Novota
Evelyn Oberdorfer
Douglas Owens-Pike
Kirk Pederson
Jeffrey Peterson
Sara Peterson
Andy Polzin
Tim Power
Raj Rajan
David Rapaport
Jake Reint
Mary Kay Ryan-Boehm
Chris Schoenherr
Karen Schultz
Doug Shoemaker
Shelley Shreffler
Al Singer
Christene Sirois Kron
John Stine
Maria Surma Manka
Pete Swenson
Leisa Thompson
Angus Vaughan
Donald Verbick
Judy Voigt
Wesli Waters
Jason Willett
Devin Zeller

 

Didn’t have a chance to donate in June? No worries. You can support us anytime with a gift of any size. Learn more about where your dollars go, or make a contribution here. Questions? Drop a comment here or send me an email anytime.

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Sacha Seymour-Anderson

POSTED BY:

Development Director

MAWQCP: Protecting Agricultural Water Quality Through Certification and Collaboration

July 6th, 2016

All Minnesotans want access to clean water and all Minnesota farmers want clean water to be part of their legacy.

The Minnesota Agricultural Water Quality Certification Program (MAWQCP) is a new, voluntary, state-federal program that offers Minnesota’s farmers the chance to certify their legacy of stewardship and protect the Land of 10,000 Lakes’ greatest natural resource. After a brief pilot phase, MAWQCP went statewide in July 2015. Since then, the program has certified 198 farms and we just recently celebrated a 100,000-acre milestone for the program.

The program’s unique structure is crucial to its success. MAWQCP is delivered in partnership with Minnesota’s 89 Soil and Water Conservation Districts (SWCDs) and it’s easy for farmers and landowners to navigate. Minnesota’s SWCDs are trusted partners and frequent collaborators among the state’s farmers. The process for getting certified is straightforward and personalized – all a farmer needs to do to get started is contact their local SWCD.family next to farmstead sign

There are four steps to the water quality certification process:

  • Assessment – a certification specialist conducts an assessment of a farm’s current risk to water quality on a field-by-field basis using an online tool;
  • Collaboration – the certification specialist meets with the farmer to go over the results of the baseline assessment and collaborates on a plan for mitigating any risks to water identified in the assessment;
  • Verification – the certification specialist conducts a field verification to ensure all risks to water quality have been treated, or that a plan is in place to address the risk;
  • Ongoing Support – the certification specialist and farmer stay in touch as the farmer continues to make improvements and changes.

The process is not one-size fits all. When risks to water quality are identified, farmers are eligible to receive priority technical and financial assistance to make the improvements that make the most sense, economically and environmentally, for their operation. Once they are certified, farmers and landowners receive regulatory certainty and are deemed to be in compliance with any new water quality laws or rules for 10 years.

Traditionally, conservation has been delivered in a piecemeal fashion with a farmer implementing one conservation practice at a time. While individual practices can provide real environmental benefits, they often don’t treat all the risks to water quality on a farm all at once. MAWQCP’s model of conservation delivery overcomes this shortfall. The program works in collaboration with farmers and addresses risks to water quality for every field and every crop on their operations. This field-by-field, crop-by-crop methodology allows small acts of conservation to aggregate quickly, creating meaningful water quality benefits for all Minnesotans.

To date, the program has generated more than 300 new conservation practices, from cover crops to improved nutrient management that are annually:

  • Stopping 7.7 million pounds of sediment from entering our waters,
  • Preventing more than 4,700 pounds of phosphorus from entering our lakes and streams, and
  • Keeping more than 10 million pounds of soil where it belongs, in Minnesota fields.

As more farmers learn about the program and become certified, its positive impact on Minnesota will continue to grow. MAWQCP will help ensure Minnesota’s farms and waters can prosper together, which is a legacy all Minnesotans can be proud of.

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A note from Environmental Initiative:

We’ve partnered with MAWQCP through our Field Stewards program. Farmers who are certified through MAWQCP (currently only in Stearns County) are eligible to receive a per acre payment for their conservation practices by enrolling in Field Stewards. This partnership with MAWQCP avoids duplicate certification standards and ensures farmers are recognized and rewarded for their conservation efforts. Learn more about Field Stewards »

MAWQCP is a partnership between the United States Department of Agriculture, the Minnesota Department of Agriculture, the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Learn more about MAWQCP »

POSTED BY:

Minnesota Agricultural Water Quality Certification Program Manager, Minnesota Department of Agriculture

Meet Great River Energy: Member of the Month

July 5th, 2016

Great River Energy is a not-for-profit cooperative which provides wholesale electric service to 28 distribution cooperatives located in Minnesota. Those member cooperatives distribute electricity to approximately 665,000 families, farms and businesses. With $4 billion in assets, Great River Energy is the second largest electric power supplier in Minnesota, and one of the largest generation and transmission cooperatives in the United States.

Great River Energy takes great pride in conducting our business with a high concern for the environment.

We are committed to conserving resources through environmental stewardship, pollution prevention, waste minimization, recycling and reuse. This dedication is demonstrated by the inclusion of environmental sustainability in our mission.

As a cooperative, Great River Energy holds commitment to community in high regard. One of the ways we do that is through re-establishing native habitat.

We are excited to be announcing a new project!HQ prairie solar.jpg

Together with the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) and the city of Elk River, Great River Energy will be converting nine acres into pollinator prairie habitat at its Elk River campus off U.S. Highway 10. With more than 27,000 cars driving by daily, this well-traveled area is perfect for educating the traveling public about the importance of pollinator friendly, prairie plantings.

Past native prairie projects

Great River Energy, for the last decade, has invested in over 200 acres of re-established native prairie.  Some of Great River Energy’s native prairie projects include:

  • Establishing native prairie along transmission lines outside of Savage, Minn., and in the city of Ramsey, Minn., both with park systems.
  • Planting pollinator friendly habitat along Wolf Ridge Environmental Learning Center’s solar array and in their interpretive center in fall 2015.
  • Incorporating pollinator prairie as part of the landscape architecture at Great River Energy’s headquarters building in Maple Grove, Minn.
  • Restoring more than 120 acres of prairie near Lakefield Junction Station, Pleasant Valley Peaking Station, Cambridge Peaking Plant, and near Great River Energy’s New Prague office.

More resources

For more information about the Elk River pollinator project, visit greatriverenergy.com/elkriverbees.

For more information and links to resources about native plantings, visit greatriverenergy.com/pollinators.

Great River Energy has had a long-term commitment to Environmental Initiative. We have been a member of the Convener Partnership Circle for some time, and this year marked our ninth year as a presenting sponsor of the Environmental Initiative Awards program held each May. Great River Energy is a proud supporter of Environmental Initiative.

Mary Jo Roth

POSTED BY:

Manager, Environmental Services at Great River Energy

Great River Energy Partnership Provides Pollinator Habitat

June 21st, 2016

It’s no secret that our insect pollinators are in danger. We know if we don’t do something soon, we risk losing many of our domesticated bees and entire species of wild pollinators.

In fact, Environmental Initiative held a summit earlier this spring in partnership with the Minnesota Department of Agriculture to gather real and meaningful ideas from the community to protect pollinators from stressors like habitat loss, pesticides use and a changing climate.Monarch on flower.jpg

We were excited to learn that Great River Energy, one of our longstanding members and supporters, is working to help create valuable habitat for bees and butterflies.

In honor of National Pollinator Week, June 20 to 26, I sat down with Craig Poorker, manager, land rights at Great River Energy to learn more about their work and get their advice for businesses that are considering doing the same.

To get started, what is Great River Energy doing to provide pollinator habitat?

Great River Energy, along with the city of Elk River and the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT), is working to bring back nine acres of vibrant, ecologically-diverse pollinator friendly native habitat at our Elk River campus on U.S. Highway 10. It is a unique opportunity for us to add to the nationwide effort to restore pollinator populations, while also working with partners who are committed to doing the same.

Where did the idea come from?

Great River Energy has been a leader in restoring native habitat for more than a decade. We have restored about 200 acres of native habitat across Minnesota, including at our headquarters facility in Maple Grove, near our peaking stations and along a transmission line near Savage, Minn. We also recently worked on a small planting and educational event with Wolf Ridge Environmental Learning Center, where fifth graders participated in a prairie planting near a solar array.

While Great River Energy has long been committed to native habitat re-establishment, there is so much public support for pollinator habitat projects that we began looking for more opportunities again last year.

The Elk River campus is a unique location for pollinator habitat. We’re able to educate more and increase environmental awareness simply because our project is located near the Mississippi River along one of Minnesota’s most heavily traveled roads. An estimated 27,700 motorists will pass by the new prairie every day.

What was your biggest challenge with this project?

Our lawn has always been well manicured and appreciated by our employees and the community. It is a noticeable landmark in Elk River so we knew that it was important to start talking with community leaders and employees in advance to help them understand the “why’s” behind the change.

Awareness of the decline in pollinator populations is high and many people are excited about the project. We are hearing a lot of positive support. On the other hand, we also know that the lawn will be missed.

We are working with highly experienced landscape architects and prairie experts to make sure we do it right. We also know it will take some time before the native habitat is fully established.

Restoring pollinator habitat will give the campus a new look, and an important new purpose. Once the plants mature, the campus will be a beautiful new source of pride. It will not happen overnight. Fortunately, we do have an underground sprinkler system that will help the prairie mature more quickly than it otherwise would.

Why did Great River Energy decide to do this?

This is the right project at the right time for the right reasons. Both MnDOT and the city of Elk River, through their Energy City plan, also have pollinator habitat goals, and this is a great way to support each other and the environment. Four of the nine acres of this project are in MnDOT’s right of way.

And the time is right. The decline in pollinator populations is widely recognized now, and public awareness of the importance of native habitat has significantly increased.

Approximately 25 percent of Great River Energy’s employees work and live in Elk River. This is an opportunity for us all to support the nationwide effort.

What one piece of advice would you give other businesses and organizations that are looking to try something similar?

Help people understand why your project is important, find experienced vendors to work with, and find like-minded partners. We can do more together than individually. We appreciate our partnership with MnDOT and the city of Elk River. This partnership and project supports important environmental goals that that we all share.

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Emily Franklin

POSTED BY:

Director of Communications

It’s Smog Season: What It Means and What You Can Do

June 9th, 2016

If you step outside today, there’s no denying that summer is officially here. Along with the good things that summer brings, like beaches, grill-outs, fishing, and freeze pops, summer also brings some not-so-good things, like mosquitoes and (drumroll please…) air pollution.

Ground level ozone (you probably know it as smog) forms when Volatile Organic Compounds, or VOC’s (the stuff that you smell when you run your lawnmower, have a bonfire, or use spraypaint) combine in the atmosphere with Nitrogen Oxides, or NOx (the stuff that comes from your car’s tailpipe) in the presence of heat and sunlight.MNAQAlert6-9-16

But wait, ozone is a good thing, right?

It is…as long as it exists in the stratosphere, protecting us from UV radiation. At ground level, it is best compared to a sunburn on your lungs, causing burning and irritation and triggering asthma attacks and cardiovascular problems. Over time, that irritation can contribute to chronic respiratory diseases and decreased lung function.

Right on cue, the warm-up over the next few days is causing ground level ozone forecasts to spike, peaking Saturday at a 97 on the air quality index, and triggering an air pollution health advisory for portions of western, central and southern Minnesota. While the high temperatures create a challenging situation, there are still some easy steps that you can take to help reduce your pollution contribution over the next few days.

  • Avoid single-occupancy car trips and gas up at night
    Cars are a source of both volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides, especially if they are in need of a tune-up. Consider avoiding single-occupancy trips by carpooling, taking public transit, working from home, or, better yet, taking a summer Friday off of work. While we’re talking about cars, consider putting off gassing up until the evening, when the heat of the day has passed and ozone concentrations are declining.
  • Don’t mow your lawn
    That wonderful smell of fresh cut grass is actually volatile organic compounds being emitted into the air. These emissions come from the small engines on lawnmowers and weedwackers and from the grass itself. Be a good neighbor and consider putting off mowing for a couple of days.
  • Put off that painting project
    Again, that smell of fresh paint is actually the smell of VOC’s. If you’re planning home improvement or painting projects, consider holding off on any painting or staining until the weather cools.
  • Be Air Aware
    Knowledge is power, right? Learn about current air quality conditions, forecasts, and actions that you can take both on air quality days and in your everyday life to reduce your air pollution footprint at beairawaremn.org, a website built and curated by Clean Air Minnesota’s partners. Consider downloading the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency’s mobile app or signing up for e-mail or twitter alerts.
Mikey Weitekamp

POSTED BY:

Senior Project Manager, Environmental Initiative
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